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Preterm Labor

 

Preterm labor is when you go into labor before the 37th week of pregnancy. This is scary because baby may come out when he’s not fully ready and developed.

 

Preeclampsia

 

It's condition when you have a combination of high blood pressure and the appearance of protein in your urine (which is a sign that your kidneys aren't working 100 percent). It's also known as toxemia or pregnancy-induced hypertension and is usually diagnosed after week 20.

 

Stretch Marks

 

Stretch marks are reddish, purple or pink (sometimes brown, depending on your skin tone) depressed streaks that can be found on your boobs, stomach, butt, hips and thighs — just to name a few places. Stretch marks are actually scars from your skin tearing as your body grows rapidly during pregnancy.

 

Gestational Diabetes

 

Some women develop diabetes only during pregnancy; it’s called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is defined as glucose intolerance that is first diagnosed in pregnancy, and it occurs when pregnancy hormones affect how the body makes or uses insulin, which is a hormone that converts sugar in food into energy the body uses.

 

If your body doesn't make enough insulin or if it doesn't use the insulin appropriately, the level of sugar in the blood rises to an unacceptable level. This is called hyperglycemia and means you have too much sugar in your blood. Occasionally, hormones made by the placenta can also hamper the actions of insulin, and gestational diabetes can occur. Several other factors can affect your glucose levels, including stress, the time of day (glucose values are often higher in the morning), the amount of exercise you do and the amount of carbohydrates in your diet.

 

Allergies During Pregnancy

 

It’s completely normal (and helpful!) for your body to notice when you’ve got something harmful in there, but when it declares all-out war on an invader that really isn’t so bad — like pollen or pet dander —that overreaction is considered an allergy.

 

Leg Cramps During Pregnancy

 

Youch! Leg cramps happen when your muscles suddenly tighten — and they hurt!

 

High Cholesterol During Pregnancy

 

Also known as hypercholesterolemia, high blood cholesterol means you have too much cholesterol (you guessed it) in your blood. Cholesterol is a type of fat that your body needs to function, but too much can clog your arteries and increase your risk of heart disease and stroke.

 

Anemia During Pregnancy

 

If you're anemic, that means you have too few red blood cells (the cells that carry oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your blood) or they’re too small. If it's iron-deficiency anemia, it's due to low levels of iron in your blood. But there are many other types of anemia that are caused by illness or disease, such as sickle-cell anemia.

 

Heartburn During Pregnancy

 

It’s when acid bubbles up from your gut and irritates your esophageal lining, causing discomfort or pain.

 

Cold During Pregnancy

 

There are actually more than 200 viruses that can cause “the common cold,” an infection of the upper respiratory tract. You’re more prone to colds — and they can last longer — while you’re expecting, because pregnancy suppresses the immune system. If this is the first cold you’ve had since you’ve been pregnant, you’re probably wondering how the heck to deal with one while you’re pregnant.

 

Braxton Hicks Contractions

 

Braxton Hicks contractions (named after the English doctor who first described them in 1872) are relatively painless, irregular and infrequent contractions that start around week six and last until the weeks before delivery. Though they start in the first months, you probably won't feel them until around week 28 (if at all). These contractions are your body's way of practicing and preparing for labor.

 

Sinusitis During Pregnancy

 

Sinusitis is just a fancy name for a sinus infection. It happens when your sinuses become inflamed and swollen, and mucus can’t drain properly. It’s bad enough when you’re not pregnant, but it’s even worse when you are pregnant because it’s hard to tell whether the symptoms are caused by an actual infection or just your hormones.

 

Constipation During Pregnancy

 

You might have that “stopped up” feeling, abdominal discomfort or have feces that are dry or hardened. Going to the bathroom could be difficult or painful.

 

Gas And Bloating During Pregnancy

 

Pain, belching, bloating and other nasties are no fun, but — sorry — they sort of come along with the job of carrying a baby.

 

Morning Sickness

 

Before your pregnancy, you probably imagined that when you woke up in the morning, you’d be nauseous, throw up and then go on with your day. Well...not so much. Whoever decided to call it “morning sickness” was probably sleeping through the day, because this nausea doesn’t discriminate between the morning, afternoon or evening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*This article contains general information only and is not intended to replace advice from a qualified health professional.

 
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